Tag Archives: #positivity

Moment of Signal and Sreedhar Bevara

‘Keep Finding Your Signals’ Says Sreedhar Bevara In His Book

Learning is a process that never stops in our lives, and this is a truth not just for the laymen but for leaders too.

A quote from Indra Nooyi drives home that point with great force: “Just because you are CEO, don’t think you have landed. You must continually increase your learning, the way you think, and the way you approach the organization.”

The success and progress of any organization or nation are often attributed to the efficacy of its leaders. Leadership has been a part of human experience, and the traits that crown one as an effective leader transcend gender norms.

Sreedhar Bevara’s book Moment of Signal forays into the territory of leadership and discusses at length the qualities and characteristics of a leader. It is based on a very interesting yet simple premise which is presented in a unique way.

Signal is the catchword in Bevara’s book. The underlying thought is that life throws signals at us, and it is very important that we stay alert to receiving those signals in order to make our existence better. The author believes that the best way to excel is not to follow the signals but to find them ourselves.

Green Stop Light

The author’s story

It is impressive to learn how the author in his own life has identified the right signals that have paved the way for success. Born in a village in Andhra Pradesh, Sreedhar Bevara had felt the pangs of poverty as a child. He and his siblings were brought up by relatives. To make ends meet, he waited tables and worked as a milk delivery boy.

Rising from extremely humble origins, it was hard work, sincerity, and of course listening to signals around him that eventually helped him to climb up the corporate leader. Based out of Dubai, Sreedhar Bevara is a senior corporate executive in a Fortune 100 MNC. He is also a motivational speaker on leadership issues. On the way is his second book, The Roaring Lambs, which is a leadership fable of animals set against the backdrop of an East African jungle.

What is Moment of Signal all about?

With ample references to world leaders, CEOs, and entrepreneurs, Moment of Signal highlights what qualities make these individuals the success stories we talk about. These examples are found all over in different chapters to substantiate the importance of the trait that the author analyzes. He also cites instances from his personal and professional life.

Moment of Signal does not attempt to present an overtly intellectual discussion of leadership; hence it is not intimidating. The ideas are very relatable to anyone in the organizational domain, and this is what makes them intelligible. I would like to refer to some of the viewpoints which I find particularly appealing.

*** Sreedhar Bevara strongly feels that grace is one of the most important features of great leaders without which other traits are as good as empty. He says, “Grace costs nothing but buys us a lot of good will.” To exhibit grace in uncertainty, pain, and in the looming face of the inevitable is the sign of strength of a true leader.

*** Prejudice, lack of empathy, arrogance, and resistance to change are pointed out as some of the ills that a leader needs to avoid. The I-centric concept is discussed. Bevara emphasizes that anyone at the helm of affairs who has an “I know it all” attitude will end up in isolation.

*** The workplace flourishes with a collaborative mindset. It is very important that team members open-heartedly accept each other’s weaknesses and strengths and have a mutual understanding amongst themselves.

*** The ability to visualize beyond what is evident distinguishes a good decision maker from a bad one. The person who senses the signals around the corner and pictures the future emerges as the victor.

.*** A topic that perhaps many books on leadership might ignore is that of health. A fitness enthusiast himself, Sreedhar Bevara talks about health, which is “the highest religion of existence” and which should not be neglected nor taken for granted. Be it in the workplace or one’s own home, there needs to be a supportive environment that promotes health and well-being.

A practical, comprehensive guide to leadership

Moment of Signal is a comprehensive analysis of the various dimensions that help to shape a good leader. There is no foolproof recipe that makes a perfect leader, and the book asserts that. The author has a practical approach and mentions towards the end that the primary objective is “not guaranteeing a successful outcome.” He insists, “It is more to do with reducing the possibility of any negative outcome.”

A brilliant read in its entirety, Moment of Signal throws a bright light on leadership, entrepreneurship, and workplace issues, and manages to do so in a lucid, concise, and interesting way!


Rashmi Bora Das is settled in the suburbs of Atlanta, GA. She has written for various platforms including Women’s Web, to which she regularly contributes. 

Being Thankful & Keeping My Sunny Side Up

Fall is my most favorite season of the year. I love seeing the leaves of trees change colors, and the pleasantly mild temperatures encourage me to take long walks. As we celebrate Thanksgiving at the end of November, we reflect on our blessings in life. This year, it has become all the more important to be grateful for all that we have, with the world being caught in the grip of an invisible monster that is shaking the world!

Every day, I wake up with a thought that is not at all comforting. A question arises as to how long the cloud of uncertainty will be hovering over us. It was mid-March when I first wrote an article on the COVID-19 situation, and 8 months later, we are still battling it.

In the wake of this crisis, the issue of mental health is one of grave concern. What has emerged as a very crucial requirement for all of us is the need to be happy. I don’t know if it’s the few strands of gray that have made me older and wiser, but the pandemic has made me look at life from a different perspective. I’m pleasantly surprised that I have emerged as a more optimistic person than I was before.

Learning is a continuous process, and at times, certain events or circumstances reinforce what we have learned in the past with even greater strength. If I were asked what are the values the world needs to learn the most from the pandemic, I have an instant answer. Gratitude, positivity, and acceptance are the values we need to embrace. I have definitely made them my mantras.

We pass the test of humanity when we conduct ourselves with grace and dignity during turbulent times. For a change, let’s divert our minds from the negatives and focus on the brighter side of what life has to offer. This is my personal viewpoint, yet I am confident that there will be many who will identify with me.

The pandemic has definitely turned our lives topsy-turvy, but we could be in a much worse situation. I came across a beautiful piece “Be Happy You Weren’t Born in 1900” which asks the reader to imagine a hypothetical scenario of being born in 1900 and living through a spate of unfortunate historical events. The story starts with the beginning of World War I on one’s 14th birthday and ends with the conclusion of the Vietnam War upon turning 75. The examples of the Spanish Flu, the Great Depression, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Cuban missile crisis are also put in that timeline. Truly, would it have been easy for someone to live through tragedies that happened so close on the heels of one another?

Although it is the human tendency to complain, we need to take into account all that we have at this moment. If there’s a roof over our heads and food at the dining table, we need to consider ourselves blessed. One should be happy if there’s a monthly check coming home rather than evaluating how satisfying or not his or her job is. If we are together with our family members, we need to appreciate those moments.

“When life gives you lemons, make lemonade,” goes the proverb. It is certainly possible that we can beat a lot of the current COVID-related stress with a positive attitude. What can be a more opportune time to unravel and discover what we are capable of doing in order to sail through this storm with ease? And along with discovering our creative sides, we need to add that special dose of humor to make our days even sunnier!

Writing has always been my passion, and I have utilized this period to the fullest in order to give vent to my creative side. I have written more than I ever did because I have been spending a lot of time at home. My daily schedule has been a disciplined one, with daily yoga and pranayama being added to the routine.

So many people are discovering their hidden potential! It will perhaps not be an exaggeration to say that the world is buzzing with new singers, chefs, poets, artists, and other talented individuals during the corona crisis! On my family front itself, it is so heartwarming to see that my 24-year-old boy and my nieces have turned into accomplished chefs during this period. So isn’t it time for me and my sister-in-law to rejoice that our kids are ready to take over the kitchen and give mommy a break? One of my nieces has also rediscovered her childhood love for painting and has come up with brilliant pieces of art.

All human beings under the wide sky need to be treated as equals. As much as we know that, we tend to forget. As COVID-19 is holding the world in its frightening grip, the whole of humanity is on the same footing. The invisible monster has not made any distinction with respect to gender, status, race, religion, or sexuality. If this is not the time to practice kindness and acceptance, I don’t know when it’ll ever be.

Every small action counts. If we can spread some happiness by giving others a listening ear to their problems or perform some act of kindness, let’s do so. We all need to shed labels, cast aside prejudices of all types, and accept our fellow beings for who or what they are.

Adversity does not last forever. There will always be light at the end of the tunnel. All that we need at this moment is patience and composure. The mosaic of our lives is made up of all those small pieces that contribute towards making it a meaningful whole. So let us live in the moment and raise a toast to the tiniest of things that bring us happiness and make us smile, for the rainbow after the storm will definitely emerge!

Here’s to wishing all a safe and happy Thanksgiving! Be thankful and stay blessed!


Rashmi Bora Das is settled in the suburbs of Atlanta, GA. She has written for various platforms including Women’s Web to which she regularly contributes. 

Fighting Cancer, Choosing Hope

In 2012, Munira Premji was an active woman filled with the joy of life. Her career was satisfying, her marriage was wonderful, and her grown children’s successes filled her with happiness. On February 3 that year, however, her life changed dramatically with a diagnosis of Stage 4 non-Hodgkin lymphoma coupled with Stage 3 multiple myeloma. She fought both cancers fiercely, understanding that there is no current cure for multiple myeloma. Then in 2015, just when she felt ready to live the life she had to put on hold, she was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer. Now, in her book Choosing Hope: One Woman 3 Cancers, Premji shares her journey as not a victim but as a champion.

Premji is an engaging writer whose job as an HR rep worked in her favor when she was able to acquire a new cancer drug she needed at no cost through her employer. Still, her anxieties about the cost of treatments, medications, procedures, and care are never withheld as she and her family navigate the Canadian health system. She makes it clear that cancer is a costly disease on many levels.

At her daughter’s urging, Premji began chronicling her journey by blogging, keeping family and friends updated, expressing her emotions and drive to survive while documenting the processes she endured. The entries—included in the book—also reveal a courageous and resilient woman. Her anecdotes are set in the chemotherapy clinic, the hospital rooms, and her home with an extraordinary mix of humor, appreciation, and seriousness. Some are amusing, others are painful or introspective, and others celebrate the bonds between cancer patients during treatments, while in the hospital, and at support group meetings.

Although she doesn’t recount every chemo session, drug, healthcare worker, or needle stick, she gives the reader plenty to absorb. Premji is a realist, yet she remains positive when discussing foggy “chemo brain,” recalling each time her hair fell out, or reliving her struggle to produce enough stem cells to warrant surgery. To her credit, she always moves forward, even when her world looks bleaker than the day before.

Choosing hope merged with her faith when one of Premji’s chemotherapy nurses presented her with a bracelet that read, “Once you choose hope, anything is possible.” 

Premji embraced the concept, which strengthened her resolve during countless chemo sessions, hospital stays due to febrile neutropenia, the long wait to have stem cell transplantation, and the days in between chemo when she’d feel anything from energized to simply unable to move out of bed.

She’s an inspiration not only to other cancer patients and survivors but also the rest of us to stop, breathe, and embrace life. 

Premji continues to maintain her blog, has a YouTube channel, and in June of this year, she happily checked off a bucket list item by launching a podcast, Choosing Hope: Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things.


Jeanne E. Fredriksen lives in both Carolinas where she is a Books for Youth reviewer for Booklist magazine/American Library Association and a member of WCPE-FM The Classical Station’s Music Education Fund committee. This review is dedicated to her brother, Ron, who has been battling multiple myeloma.

Saath Do: The Positive Anthem We Need

Amid the coronavirus outbreak, it’s crucial to stay connected and stay positive. The world has experienced a spike in fear and post-isolation gloom, which makes digital entertainment all the more important during these difficult times. That’s precisely what India’s music industry is aiming for, with the release of a recent music video, ‘Saath Do’. 

This empowering song is the concoction of music director Bappa Lahiri, lyricist Sameer Anjaan, playback singer Shaan, and singer Anushradha Palakurthi. Against the backdrop of a soulful piano medley, Shaan and Anushradha Palakurthi sing about how we can emerge from an international pandemic by forging bonds with others and giving back to our communities. The very name of the song implies that we must give our support to coronavirus victims and communities in need. Zee Music describes the song’s purpose as a request to join hands and face common challenges, chin-up, with faith and in unity. For daylight is only a few steps away. Saath Do!” 

While the lyrics alone are powerful, the music video truly packs a punch. This video features footage from all over the world, from Indian gurdwaras to the coasts of Europe to homes in China. Rather than emphasize the dangers of the coronavirus, the video illustrates the best of humanity that has emerged amid this outbreak. One clip provides a glimpse of law enforcement aiding a homeless man on the street. Another heartwarming segment presents a young man in a mask feeding a goat. “Saath Do” exudes nothing but positivity and hope for the future. The footage from different parts of the world is a small reminder that love knows no boundaries nor borders, and we are not alone in fighting this virus. 

This isn’t the end of the road for ‘Saath Do’, however. Rather, its producers hope to reach a wider audience. When asked about his plans with the song, Bappa Lahiri mentioned, “ “Despite being stationed in different countries, we have all come together for the track. Now, I will request celebrities to feature in the video.” Although there has been no official update on celebrity involvement with this song, we can only imagine that celebrities will give their ‘saath’ in making ‘Saath Do’ the upbeat anthem we all need.

Kanchan Naik is a rising senior at the Quarry Lane School in Dublin, California. Aside from being the Youth Editor of India Currents, she is also the Editor-in-Chief of her school newspaper The Roar and the Teen Poet Laureate of Pleasanton.

You Are the Cake and More

“I start my day choosing happiness and being in the moment, as the mystery of the moment opens up to me” writes Geetanjali Arunkumar in her book, ‘You are the cake’. Such revelations that she arrived at through travails of illness and loneliness are what she shares in this debut work.

This is a book written from the heart and is a timely and gentle reminder to tap into our essence, even as many influences sap our energy and erode our confidence. A joyous, tasty metaphor for everyone alike, young, old and in-between, the title leaves open the door to accepting and enjoying who we are as individuals and build on that.

Accepting such a notion and not just thriving, but flourishing is the author’s message, one that she’s obviously been mastering even as she’s overcome inordinate challenges.

Right from the get-go the reader can realize that this author’s journey is one that many of us can relate to, even if the challenges may be varied in intensity. Reading on, one also realizes that this is not from a self-help guru, though we need guidance at times from one such, but from lived experiences and lessons learned through struggles.

As she aptly says, trusting the inner voice clarifies the action and path empowering one to make the right choices, be it of friends or partners, and other life’s decisions, big or small.

For many of us life rambles on, at times desultory and as Michelle Obama writes in, Becoming, of her good friends, ‘ Most of us lived in a state of constant calibration, tweaking one area of life in hopes of bringing more steadiness to another’, and ‘’You’re the cake’ offers a recipe for that.

I’m one for mnemonics and  “FACT-RE” as depicted by multiple layers of the cake – self- forgiveness, acceptance, compassion and trust, leading to respect and empowerment – is one I’ve begun remembering when I feel unsettled.

Original Artwork of Sravya Attaluri

Geetanjali then expounds thru’ the Recipe and Utensils used for cooking up happiness, emphasizes what seems obvious, such as hobbies, but often ignored, limited by our daily lives. 

The author quotes Muhammad Ali, “It’s the affirmations that lead to beliefs, and moreover once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.”  Affirmations convert desires into reality, but she points out it’s good to be realistic about desires to begin with, and with time it will lead to greater things. 

Geetanjali provides tools like journaling, keeping a gratitude diary, or even tasks as simple as, when falling asleep ‘being grateful for the smallest things that happened during the day’ and, ‘ wak[ing] up in the morning using Abraham/Esther Hicks method of seventeen seconds of positivity and beauty.’ These soften the dissonance or even chime a song in our hearts!

Showing appreciation and acknowledging another person and being non-judgmental, as we’d like to be treated ourselves, strengthens the other and certainly builds lasting relationships.

I wish I’d had this book when I’d had an accident some long years back and was quite dispirited , but needing to pick myself back up, raise our toddler son and get back to work, with great support from my husband and loved ones.

There’s a Tamil proverb my grandma used to tell my mom, which roughly translates to, ‘only if you have a wall, can you paint a mural’. Only when we are kind to and take care of ourselves, can we be of support to others 

Geetanjali’s talents show not only in her writing style – such as, “…. Ways to unfold your soul, which whispers to you the truth of your gifts…” and inspiring thoughts, which are well-researched and informed, but also she accompanies them with lively and spot-on illustrations. This Bay Area author serves up the cake with swirls of decadence and pearls of wisdom on an inviting platter! 

Madhu Raghavan is a pediatrician who enjoys writing, exploring our great outdoors, gardening and art as pastime.