Tag Archives: Journalist

Pulling Back the Curtain: Q&A With Our Assistant Editor

At India Currents, we believe that the most important news stories leave a lasting impact and also elevate local and regional issues to a national platform. 

We’re pulling back the curtain on one such piece, Will My Culture Survive the Pandemic, by conducting a Q&A with the writer and IC Assistant Editor, Srishti Prabha.

VK: How did this story come about?

SP: India Currents is fortunate to collaborate with local, diverse, community organizations. One such organization is SF-based nonprofit, Ethnic Media Services, which aims to inform minority media on issues relevant to them. At one of their media briefings, the topic discussed was Arts and Culture on Life Support Because of COVID-19 and panelists relayed their personal experiences, as artists impacted by the pandemic. I began to reflect on my own connection with my culture and art. Despite not relying on the arts as a source of income, I would be devoid of my identity without art. That is how I began to frame my article. Indians in America grasp at sources for identity and performing arts are the magical bridge that can teleport us to our motherland. 

VK: What was the most surprising discovery you made while reporting it?

SP: The performing arts were the first industry to shut down as a response to COVID and will be the last to reopen. This sounds intuitive and may not be surprising for people to hear, but the sheer breadth of what that means – the economic loss, individuals with no foreseeable income, and possibly, the erasure of culture – is something that wasn’t being addressed in mainstream media. Subsequently, it wasn’t where resources were being allocated. Since the Great Depression, federal funding hasn’t been given to the Arts. I became fixated on the potential loss of minority arts. 

VK: What was the message of your article?

SP: My hope was to reinvigorate interest in minority-run cultural arts, even in those that meander away from the South Asian culture. My article had a three-fold purpose: first, to shed light on South Asian arts and artists that were undergoing a strenuous time; second, to have the reader actualize their relationship with the arts and its connection to cultural identity; and third, I wanted the article to be a poignant reminder for those that take interest in the arts, to sustain it.

VK: Why do you think this article resonated with readers?

SP: One can never be sure of what resonates with a reader, but I write from a place of empathy and advocacy for culture and minority voices. I can only speak to my own experience, as a first-generation Indian American, yet I find cross-cultural narratives on identity humanizes what people consider an “other”. As Americans, we benefit from exposure to multiculturalism and can create inclusive spaces. India Currents facilitates such discourse. I write for the readers – I write for myself. You are all on the journey with me, of self-exploration and pandemic pursuits. 

Reporters like Srishti Prabha work hard on stories like these in order to present the complete picture for our readers. It’s the kind of in-depth reporting that you’d be hard-pressed to find anywhere else—the kind that takes time and money to produce. 

Will you support India Currents and ensure our reporters have the resources they need to do their jobs well? 

Give today and double your investment, before the NewsMatch challenge ends on December 31. 


Vandana Kumar has been the Editor for India Currents and is serving as the Publisher. 

In Time of COVID-19: A Video Essay Contest

Ding Ding TV (Silicon Valley Innovation Channel and Voice of Asian Americans) together with its valued partners and sponsors is promoting a Video Essay Contest to tell the Humanistic Stories of the current pandemic. In a matter of months, COVID-19 has spread to every corner of our world causing deaths, wreaking havoc to our bodies, our well being, our health care and economic systems.

Purpose of the “In time of COVID-19” Video Essay Contest:

Every calamity carries its own humanistic stories. We believe that the current pandemic has generated a treasure trove of interesting stories about humanity in all its spectrums. Stories about greed, selfishness and scapegoating on the one side, but also stories about generosity, heroism, kindness and outstanding services to fellow human beings on the other.

This “Fighting COVID-19” Video Essay Contest is open to all independent journalists, ethnic media, event organizers and civic organization contestants. Contestants are required to submit in English a video of less than one minute in length to be accompanied by a written essay of less than 600 words. The theme should focus on the uplifting and inspirational stories relating to the current pandemic. Submissions are accepted immediately and opened until May 30, 2020.

A diverse Panel of Judges will select:
1st Prize (1 winner: $3,000), 2nd Prize (2 winners: $1,500 each), 3rd Prize (3 winners: $1,000 each). People’s Choice (1 winner: $1000).
Contestants should submit a video to be accompanied by an Essay. The video has to be less than one minute in MP4, the essay need to be less than 600 words. All contents should be in English.
Submit your presentation to contest@dingdingtv.com

More Information visit: http://www.dingdingtv.com/?p=57035&fbclid=IwAR34B9ntMlOcqKhxFOvINhD1vS3e0HFUZEb77Gl5KSB723rLQueVDp4coE8