Quilted Curtain Project For The Temple

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The community of Greater Lafayette Indiana, home of Purdue University is quilting a saree curtain to adorn the main hall of the Bharatiya Temple & Cultural Center of Greater Lafayette. The ladies of the quilting group: Medha Gore, Phullara Mukerjea, Pramila Puri and Sita Mongia are weaving together the colors of rust, brown, gold, grey, maroon, yellow, beige and green to make a striking backdrop to the community hall.

Sari’s that are thick and have a silky sheen are being collected by Rwitti Roy who is coordinating the quilt project. The Saree Donation Box is located at the temple entrance by the community connections board.

“Your donations are greatly appreciated to make this quilt project colorful,” says Executive Committee member and Treasurer, Padma Subramaniam. “We are receiving saris by mail at 1210 Montgomery St., West Lafayette, IN 47906 as well. If you can’t come to the temple but want your sari to adorn the temple please do send us your sari, we will do our best to include it.” For any questions, please email [email protected] or [email protected]

 The mission of Bharatiya Temple & Cultural Center of Greater Lafayette (BTCCGL) is to promote fellowship among members of the Greater Lafayette Community of Indian origin through cultivation of religious, social, and cultural interactions. The Temple opened formally on December 9, 2012. Sri Gurukul from Chicago conducted the ceremony, which was attended by over hundred community members. The goal of the temple would be to provide avenues for religious, humanitarian, cultural and educational resources to the community.

The temple performs nitya puja: Monday-Saturday: 6:30-8pm  Aarti is conducted at 7:00pm. On Sunday: 10:30-Noon, Aarti is conducted at 10:45 am.

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