Imran Khan’s latest big screen outing Mere Brother Ki Dulhan (MBKD) had many expectations riding, given the critical and commercial acclaim of his last film Delhi Belly.

Imran Khan in the movie Luck

Imran Khan in the movie Luck

Dulhan has fared fairly well at the box-office both in India and abroad. In a post-release interview, the actor, who happens to be superstar Aamir Khan’s nephew, shares why he is happy with his decision to do MBKD.

How satisfied are you with the response to MBKD?

I am thrilled. So far, it has been the biggest opener for me. That is a very big deal.

Has this been bigger than Delhi Belly (DB) which released in July 2011?

This one has opened much, much higher than DB. DB had opened to some pretty high numbers but this has overtaken it.

In terms of performance and creative satisfaction, which of your eight movies has been your best so far?

The best will always be Jaane Tu… Ya Janne Na (JTYJN). JTYJN is my first film and there is an emotional connect to it, apart from everything else. My reason to do MBKD was to do something which would connect more with the heartland of India. Until this movie, whatever I have done has been a much more urban thing, be it an I Hate Luv Stories (IHLS), or Break Ke Baad, or Delhi Belly. MBKD, of all other films I have done, has performed stronger in the heartland of India—in UP, Punjab, Gujarat. This market was not my strong point until now.

With this film performing so well in these markets, it means I am expanding my market, which is something an actor really wants to do.

Did it matter to you that MBKD was a Yash Raj banner production?

You know there are three things that I look at—script, director, and producer. You need to have a script that you find entertaining and makes you feel like you might watch the movie.

You must have a director who can convince you that “this guy will execute the script,” and make an exciting and entertaining film. And you must have a producer who can support and promote the film correctly. The best of scripts and directors, if let down by the producers, will not be able to make a good film. All three are important for me.

Do you feel that the character you play in MBKD is very similar to what you played in IHLS?

In MBKD, my character Kush is a very well behaved boy, from a middle class family, doesn’t drink, smoke, date girls. In IHLS, my character (Jay Dhingra) did everything, partied heavily, and was with a new girl every night. I didn’t see any similarities. Kush is really not similar to him.

MBKD has quite a few entertaining incidents—your being kidnapped under sedation, the risky-looking scooter balancing act … any such interesting episodes in real life?

Not really.  I have generally been a responsible and well-behaved individual. (smiles)

Of your eight movies so far, four are under debutant directors, including MBKD under Ali Abbas Zafar. Was that a conscious decision?

You know, I meet anyone who calls me. I sign on to projects that excite me. For the most part, I meet directors who are closer to my age. We tend to speak the same language, tend to have similar interests in life, so I think the stories that they are telling tend to connect with me. I react at an emotional level. If I hear a story from a guy, and it catches my attention and interest, then I want to do that script.

What do we expect from you next?

Currently I am shooting Ek Main Aur Ek Tu for Dharma Productions that has me and Kareena (Kapoor) working together for the first time. It is scheduled to release by February 2012. At this point I am not allowed to talk about it. Karan (Johar) will make the announcement.

Suchi Sargam is a journalist in India.

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