All About Getting Along

I don’t agree entirely with Jaya Padmanabhan in her November editorial (Compromise: The Dirty Word in Marriage and Politics, India Currents, November 2013).

In my view, compromise is about getting along, knowing that neither side has the the right answer all the time. Compromise should not be looked upon as winning or losing an argument. It is just a tool to learn to get along with people with whom we disagree.

When it comes to marriage, it depends on the maturity of the couples involved; mature couples understand that to “give in” is necessary at times in order to get along, since the two parties are coming from different backgrounds and/or cultures.

When it comes to politics, I agree that the government shutdown and the subsequent resolution was not a case of compromise. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed by the Congress in 2010, but the Republicans did not like it. So they tried to force changes by holding the Obama administration at ransom at the time that other matters were on the negotiation table, like tax reform and debt reduction. If the Republicans want to change the ACA, they should make sure to have a majority in both houses of Congress as well as a Republican President. Right now they don’t have such majorities and hence cannot change the ACA also known as Obamacare.

Ben Antao

A Great Singer 

It is good that India Currents is featuring diverse topics in the magazine. Coverageof renowned personalities, politicians and musicians are illuminating and bring to life many unknown aspects about the featured personages.

Sandip Roy’s article on Manna Dey was very refreshing. (Wearing His Crown Lightly, India Currents, November 2013).During the late 50s I heard the song “Pyar Hua Ikraar Hua” playing on loudspeakers during religious festivals. The song remained in my memory over the years. It was a song by Manna Dey and Lata Mangeshkar from the movie Shree 420 played by the actors Rajkapor and Nargis. Manna Dey was a great singer and I will always remember his timeless melodies.

K. N. Ganesh, Fremont, CA

The Original Bose

The Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to Francois Englert of Belgium and Peter Higgs of Scotland for predicting the existence of a super-particle boson (1964) capable of acquiring mass when moving in a strong external field.

These theorists did not have the chance to work with big computer banks in their research. Intense collaborative work by a large team of scientists made it possible to validate this prediction and convincingly identify the product particle as the Higgs boson. The award to this team this year was anticipated due to the media exposure of the massive effort and the suggested name: “God Particle” for the new strange particle due to its potential to perhaps explain the origin of the universe. The winners, Englert and Higgs, are to be congratulated.

The saga of the bosons is a tortured one. Satyendranath Bose (1894-1974), working at the University of Calcutta, developed a statistical model for sub-atomic particles in nature. The particles obeying this behavior were named “bosons” after the inventor. Bose predicted that such particles could be condensed under extremely low temperatures. Such deposits, if they occurred, were named Bose Condensates. His seminal paper on this subject was published in 1924.S.N. Bose was a super-capable scientist, an intuitive genius and one of the top brains of the world during the last century. It’s too bad his name was never considered for the Nobel award during his life time.

P. Mahadevan, CA
A Powerful Recollection

Benedito Ferrao wrote a truly amazing piece about a wonderful human being(The Journey Home, India Currents, October 2013). Thank you for writing this Benedito and thank you India Currents for publishing. Sandhya Radhakrishnan, online. This captivating piece captures Andy’s true essence and the extraordinary legacy he left behind. Bravo to Benedito for this remarkable story and gratitude to India Currents for printing it.

Joanne R., online

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