Are you of Asian Indian origin residing in the United States? And, do you suffer from a food allergy?

If so, click here to complete this survey!

This survey is being conducted by a team of researchers from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, and Stanford University School of Medicine. The goal of the survey is to explore food allergy among adults and children of Asian Indian descent in the United States. Not much is currently known on that topic, and hence your participation in the survey, if applicable, would be much appreciated. Participation in the survey is entirely voluntary. The survey is anonymous and there will not be any information you give that can identify you or your child. The information will be used to advance knowledge regarding allergies among individuals of Asian Indian origin.

For more information and to access the survey, please visit:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SouthAsianFoodAllergySurvey

Or visit: http://www.ruchigupta.com/current-study-recruitment/

Given below is information from the researchers on the importance of studying food allergies.

Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening immunologic reaction to food protein upon consumption of food. It affects 8% of children in the United States, while almost 40% of children with food allergy experience a severe reaction.1 Common symptoms include hives, vomiting, dizziness, shortness of breath, and wheezing. Past studies demonstrate that food allergy prevalence is on the rise,2 yet factors contributing to food allergy development are still not well understood.

Major hypotheses for food allergy development include, but are not limited to, birth via Ceasarian section, the hygiene hypothesis, and infant eczema. Previous literature suggests that environmental changes upon migration to a new country may contribute to peanut allergy development among immigrant populations. When observing a group of Australian infants, peanut prevalence among infants with both parents born in East Asia was 7.7%, 6.7% for infants with one parent born in East Asia, and 2.3% for infants with both parents born in Australia.3 There is a burgeoning prevalence of food allergic disorders in individuals of Asian origin residing in the USA. Review of the scarce literature published on this topic4 reveals the possibility that Asians have higher odds of food allergy compared with Caucasian children, but significantly lower odds of formal diagnosis.

In addition to environment, distinctive cultural practices and dietary cuisine may contribute to food allergies. South Asian diets are often different from Western diets. A study on food allergy among Indian adults in Karnataka, South India suggested that cow’s milk and apple were among common food allergens.5 Other sources also suggest that eggplant, melon, and legumes like chickpea are commonly reported food allergens for Indian adults. A pilot study exploring food allergies among individuals in Kansas City, Missouri of Asian Indian descent revealed that Indian Americans have ‘different’ food allergens  (such as chickpea flour, capsicum, eggplant and Indian lentils) in addition to the classic “Top 8” allergens reported in the USA (milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, fish, shellfish).6

To study the potential impact of environment and diet on food allergy development, a team of researchers from Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, and Stanford University School of Medicine are conducting a survey exploring food allergies in adults and children of Asian Indian descent in the United States. Information from this voluntary and anonymous survey will be used to advance knowledge regarding allergies among individuals of Asian Indian origin. For more information and to access the survey, please visit:

Share this: