Adeta Gayah of Florida could have been on her way to study dance for three years on a full scholarship at Bhaskara College of Fine Arts in Kerala. But she turned it down. She chose instead, to complete her education majoring in international business and communication. Gayah’s scholarship was part of her recent recognition as the 2006 Heritage India Foundation’s Most Talented International Performer. Given once every three years since 1976, the award recognizes the accomplishments of an outstanding individual of Indian ancestry, currently living abroad, who has shown superior talent and skill as a performer of dance or music. Once nominated, nominees go through an anonymous evaluation process. Gayah made it through a list of 125 nominees and eight finalists. Nineteen-year-old Gayah’s honor is doubly sweet: she is the youngest person to receive this award, which is typically not conferred upon individuals under 24. Gayah started dancing when she was 5. She studied tap, ballet, jazz, and gymnastics for eight years, and cultural Indian dancing for almost nine years, which she currently continues to learn under the direction of Chandni at C. Studios Inc. in Orlando. “For me dancing is great because it is not only a form of self-expression, but it is also a spiritual connection of music, movement, and emotion. When I am dancing I am at my happiest,” says Gayah. A career in the performing arts would be a dream come true for her. “However, living in America I’m not sure how great that market really is,” she admits. “I do have an immense passion for dancing and performing, therefore I try to believe that if it is meant for me then God will guide me to that path.” For now, that path leads to the Royal Opera House in London where she is scheduled to perform as an honorary guest performer in a show in March. “Even though I’ve been performing for many years now I still treat each performance as a separate and new experience. … I am a bit nervous and anxious to perform at the Royal Opera House. … I am excited by this great opportunity and I’m hoping I won’t let anyone down,” she says modestly.

Adeta Gayah of Florida could have been on her way to study dance for three years on a full scholarship at Bhaskara College of Fine Arts in Kerala. But she turned it down. She chose instead, to complete her education majoring in international business and communication. Gayah’s scholarship was part of her recent recognition as the 2006 Heritage India Foundation’s Most Talented International Performer. Given once every three years since 1976, the award recognizes the accomplishments of an outstanding individual of Indian ancestry, currently living abroad, who has shown superior talent and skill as a performer of dance or music. Once nominated, nominees go through an anonymous evaluation process. Gayah made it through a list of 125 nominees and eight finalists. Nineteen-year-old Gayah’s honor is doubly sweet: she is the youngest person to receive this award, which is typically not conferred upon individuals under 24. Gayah started dancing when she was 5. She studied tap, ballet, jazz, and gymnastics for eight years, and cultural Indian dancing for almost nine years, which she currently continues to learn under the direction of Chandni at C. Studios Inc. in Orlando. “For me dancing is great because it is not only a form of self-expression, but it is also a spiritual connection of music, movement, and emotion. When I am dancing I am at my happiest,” says Gayah. A career in the performing arts would be a dream come true for her. “However, living in America I’m not sure how great that market really is,” she admits. “I do have an immense passion for dancing and performing, therefore I try to believe that if it is meant for me then God will guide me to that path.” For now, that path leads to the Royal Opera House in London where she is scheduled to perform as an honorary guest performer in a show in March. “Even though I’ve been performing for many years now I still treat each performance as a separate and new experience. … I am a bit nervous and anxious to perform at the Royal Opera House. … I am excited by this great opportunity and I’m hoping I won’t let anyone down,” she says modestly.

Adeta Gayah of Florida could have been on her way to study dance for three years on a full scholarship at Bhaskara College of Fine Arts in Kerala. But she turned it down. She chose instead, to complete her education majoring in international business and communication. Gayah’s scholarship was part of her recent recognition as the 2006 Heritage India Foundation’s Most Talented International Performer. Given once every three years since 1976, the award recognizes the accomplishments of an outstanding individual of Indian ancestry, currently living abroad, who has shown superior talent and skill as a performer of dance or music. Once nominated, nominees go through an anonymous evaluation process. Gayah made it through a list of 125 nominees and eight finalists. Nineteen-year-old Gayah’s honor is doubly sweet: she is the youngest person to receive this award, which is typically not conferred upon individuals under 24. Gayah started dancing when she was 5. She studied tap, ballet, jazz, and gymnastics for eight years, and cultural Indian dancing for almost nine years, which she currently continues to learn under the direction of Chandni at C. Studios Inc. in Orlando. “For me dancing is great because it is not only a form of self-expression, but it is also a spiritual connection of music, movement, and emotion. When I am dancing I am at my happiest,” says Gayah. A career in the performing arts would be a dream come true for her. “However, living i

7c7f13d8fa2ef214ef5c5fcb8a90f3c3-2Adeta Gayah of Florida could have been on her way to study dance for three years on a full scholarship at Bhaskara College of Fine Arts in Kerala. But she turned it down. She chose instead, to complete her education majoring in international business and communication. Gayah’s scholarship was part of her recent recognition as the 2006 Heritage India Foundation’s Most Talented International Performer. Given once every three years since 1976, the award recognizes the accomplishments of an outstanding individual of Indian ancestry, currently living abroad, who has shown superior talent and skill as a performer of dance or music. Once nominated, nominees go through an anonymous evaluation process. Gayah made it through a list of 125 nominees and eight finalists. Nineteen-year-old Gayah’s honor is doubly sweet: she is the youngest person to receive this award, which is typically not conferred upon individuals under 24. Gayah started dancing when she was 5. She studied tap, ballet, jazz, and gymnastics for eight years, and cultural Indian dancing for almost nine years, which she currently continues to learn under the direction of Chandni at C. Studios Inc. in Orlando. “For me dancing is great because it is not only a form of self-expression, but it is also a spiritual connection of music, movement, and emotion. When I am dancing I am at my happiest,” says Gayah. A career in the performing arts would be a dream come true for her. “However, living in America I’m not sure how great that market really is,” she admits. “I do have an immense passion for dancing and performing, therefore I try to believe that if it is meant for me then God will guide me to that path.” For now, that path leads to the Royal Opera House in London where she is scheduled to perform as an honorary guest performer in a show in March. “Even though I’ve been performing for many years now I still treat each performance as a separate and new experience. … I am a bit nervous and anxious to perform at the Royal Opera House. … I am excited by this great opportunity and I’m hoping I won’t let anyone down,” she says modestly.

n America I’m not sure how great that market really is,” she admits. “I do have an immense passion for dancing and performing, therefore I try to believe that if it is meant for me then God will guide me to that path.” For now, that path leads to the Royal Opera House in London where she is scheduled to perform as an honorary guest performer in a show in March. “Even though I’ve been performing for many years now I still treat each performance as a separate and new experience. … I am a bit nervous and anxious to perform at the Royal Opera House. … I am excited by this great opportunity and I’m hoping I won’t let anyone down,” she says modestly.

…You Are Our Business Model!

More people are reading India Currents than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organizations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can.

So you can see why we need to ask for your help. Our independent, community journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.

If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure. For as little as $5, you can support us – and it takes just a moment to give via PayPal or credit card.